loading...

How Queen Margrethe of Denmark chose an exquisite gown steeped in history for a 20-minute wedding ceremony wit – Daily Mail

3 minutes, 20 seconds Read

On June 10, 1967, Princess Margrethe of Denmark married her French sweetheart in a swift 20-minute ceremony at Holmen Church in Copenhagen. 

The future Queen met diplomat Henri de Laborde de Monpeza, while studying political science at the London School of Economics in the early 1960s.

The pair began courting and announced their engagement in October 1966. 

Henri, who had to change his name to Henrik to sound more Danish, proposed with a striking Van Cleef & Arpels ‘moi et toi’ ring featuring two diamonds reportedly measuring six carats each. 

This style was especially popular in the nineteenth century after Napoleon gave Josephine, an ancestor of Margrethe, a similar ring that was set with a diamond and a sapphire.

Margarethe’s and Henrik’s swift marriage ceremony was perhaps a sign that trouble was to come. 

The pair’s union was at times tumultuous, with Henrik at one point leaving his country for several weeks after a bust-up with his wife. 

He also insisted that he did not want to be buried next to Margarethe, with his secretary saying that the decision was the ‘natural consequence of not having been treated equally to his spouse’.

His wishes were honoured when he passed away and his ashes were scattered in Danish waters and in the gardens at Fredonsborg Palace.

To marry the future monarch of Denmark, Henri had to make several sacrifices. 

As well as changing his name, he converted from Catholicism to Lutheranism, and gave up his dream of continuing his diplomatic career. 

Arriving at Holmen Church on the arm of her father, King Frederik IX, Margrethe was the picture of elegance in an ivory silk gown, designed by her mother’s favoured couturier, Jørgen Bender.

The Evangelical-Lutheran service was performed by Erik Jensen, Bishop of Aalborg and Chaplin of the Royal Court.

Paying homage to family traditions, Margrethe’s dress featured a square neck and contrasting bodice, crafted from heirloom lace belonging to her late grandmother, Princess Margaret of Connaught.

The design also boasted a dramatic 20-foot train that provided a stunning backdrop for the bride’s exquisite veil. 

Serving as her ‘something borrowed’, the Irish lace veil was previously worn by her late grandmother, Princess Margaret of Connaught, for her marriage to Prince Gustaf Adolf of Sweden at Windsor Castle in 1905.

Henri proposed with a Van Cleef & Arpels 'moi et toi' ring, featuring two diamonds, reportedly measuring six carats each

Arriving at Holmen Church on the arm of her father, King Frederik IX, Margrethe was the picture of elegance

The Princess donned an ivory silk gown by Danish couturier Jørgen Bender that featured a six-metre train

Margrethe's Irish lace veil was previously worn by her late grandmother, Princess Margaret of Connaught, for her marriage to Prince Gustaf Adolf of Sweden at Windsor Castle in 1905

The bride showcased another striking accessory with ties to her late grandmother: the Khedive of Egypt Tiara.

This glinting head ornament was given to Margaret by the Khedive as a wedding present in 1905.

It was worn as a bridal diadem by Margrethe’s youngest sister, Queen Anne-Marie, in 1964, and later by all of Queen Ingrid’s daughters and granddaughters.

Margrethe, who a third cousin of the late Queen Elizabeth II, also wore the Diamond Daisy Brooch – a sizeable jewel set with diamonds.

It was loaned by the late Queen Ingrid of Sweden, who received the brooch from her father, King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden, and wore it on her wedding day in 1935.

Denmark's royal family as well as royal figures of other countries gathered at the castle of Fredensborg to celebrate the wedding

After the ceremony, the couple headed to Fredensborg Palace and waved to well-wishers from the balcony

The newlyweds were joined by their delighted parents on the balcony

The Dutch royal family pictured on the wedding day of Prince Frederik and Mary Donaldson in 2004

The pair's union was at times tumultuous, with Henrik at one point leaving his country for several weeks after a bust-up with his wife. Above: The couple in 2002

Decades later in 2000, Ingrid gifted the jewel permanently to Margrethe, who has worn it on a number significant appearances, including her New Year’s Eve speech, announcing her abdication.

Margrethe completed her bridal look with a pair of diamond and pearl earrings, which were a present from her husband-to-be. 

Following the ceremony, Crown Princess Margrethe and Prince Henrik rode through the streets of Copenhagen in an open carriage, waving to well-wishers lining the way.

The couple soon arrived at Fredensborg Palace, where King Frederik and Queen Ingrid hosted an extravagant reception in their honour.

During his wedding speech, Prince Henrik is said to have referred to his bride as ‘the most beautiful flower in the lush garden of Denmark’.

The couple had two sons, Frederik, born in 1968, and Joachim, born in 1969.

Margrethe succeeded her father, King Frederik IX, upon his death in January 1972, becoming the first female Danish sovereign under the new Act of Succession. 

In January, after 52 years on the throne, she made the decision to abdicate in favour of Fredrik.

This post was originally published on this site

Similar Posts